Vancouver, FortisBC to co-operate on energy efficiency

Despite the City of Vancouver’s war on natural gas, the city and FortisBC, B.C.’s natural gas utility, have reached an agreement to work together on projects that will reduce Vancouver’s carbon footprint.

The city and FortisBC announced November 24 that they have signed a memorandum of understanding to co-operate on a number projects, including incentives to switch city vehicles from diesel and gasoline to cleaner burning natural gas.

“By working together, we’re finding solutions whereby we can get more efficient appliances in, reduce emissions, create pathways for things like renewable natural gas and natural gas vehicles,” said Jason Wolfe, director of energy solutions for FortisBC.

The city’s Renewable City Strategy aims to phase out natural gas, which has caused FortisBC and other businesses some concern. Only RNG would be acceptable in new developments.

The problem is that, at present, RNG is nearly non-existent. It makes up less than half of 1% of the natural gas supply in B.C.

Currently, some of the methane that is captured at the Vancouver landfill is used to generate electricity. But 40% of it is still flared. FortisBC has agreed to invest in a new system that will use that wasted resource, clean it up and inject it into the gas stream as RNG.

Even then, however, the amount of RNG FortisBC will be able to supply will still be less than 1% of the total available natural gas supply in B.C.

“We’re looking at a number of other opportunities as well,” Wolfe said. “We’ll keep adding to that number.”

Read full article here: BIV.com.

 

Vancouver falls to No. 3 as Canadian tech hub

Vancouver’s position as the country’s No. 2 destination for tech companies looking to establish operations in Canada fell victim to the backspace button in 2016.

The West Coast city dropped to third place after Ottawa made gains in CBRE’s Scoring Canadian Tech Talent report, released November 23.

Toronto ranked first.

CBRE examined the country’s 10 biggest cities and ranked them as tech hubs based on 14 factors focused on tech talent employment, education, high-tech clustering and cost competitiveness.

Despite the city’s high cost of living, the report noted Vancouver is still a competitive city for companies looking for highly skilled talent and relatively low labour costs.

And Vancouver may make gains in next year’s rankings.

This week Facebook announced it would add 16,000 square feet to its footprint to downtown Vancouver when it moves to new offices at Cadillac Fairview’s Waterfront Centre.

This comes a few weeks after Amazon announced it was opening a second downtown office in Vancouver and adding about 1,000 new workers.

A few days earlier, Microsoft announced it was adding 50 jobs focused on virtual reality and augmented reality to its Vancouver office.

Read full article here: BIV.com.